I may post fiction of mine or something I like. I may post videos or whatever. Anything I potentially like will be here.


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Jul 6, 2014
@ 1:40 am
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Why are we talking to each other in English?

— Two non English speakers who share the same first language while chatting on the net, probably (via ignitiondorks)

(via princesstucker)


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Jul 6, 2014
@ 1:39 am
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princess-slay-ya:

My most popular post has received a lot of arguments lately, so I figured I’d respond to the most common points people bring up.

Sources:

Carrie Fisher on her costumes 

what supermodels wear in hell

 on Padme’s wardrobe 

to get a general gist of Queen Jamillia’s and Oola’s screen time, here are the scripts for Attack of the Clones (Jamillia is in 359 word scene) and Return of the Jedi (Oola is in scenes that add up to 275 words)

Star Wars Bechedel Test results  here

(via hssanya)


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Jul 6, 2014
@ 1:36 am
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378,613 notes

bilby-o-and-gandy-alf:

congalineofdurin:

toriii-lane:

digitalcrayon:

trashbagtricks:

gaydarjedi:

banesboner:

thank god

*dumps entire bottle of foundation on face*

-eats lipstick-



I’m gonna start wearing makeup in my fucking sleep.





dear god, let it be enough

*swims in a pool of foundation**dries herself with blush*

bilby-o-and-gandy-alf:

congalineofdurin:

toriii-lane:

digitalcrayon:

trashbagtricks:

gaydarjedi:

banesboner:

thank god

*dumps entire bottle of foundation on face*

-eats lipstick-

I’m gonna start wearing makeup in my fucking sleep.

dear god, let it be enough

*swims in a pool of foundation*
*dries herself with blush*

(Source: marxist-gallifreyan, via hssanya)


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Jul 6, 2014
@ 1:34 am
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103,590 notes

(Source: the-pietriarchy, via hssanya)


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Jul 6, 2014
@ 1:27 am
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1,332 notes

theplaceinsidetheblizzard:

Come to the Discworld fandom where zero women are murdered for reasons of male character development.

(via hssanya)


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Jul 6, 2014
@ 1:19 am
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Children should remain silent, and they are ‘good’ when they’re quiet, but ‘bad’ when they are not, because they are disturbing the adults and causing trouble. This attitude runs through the way people interact with children on every level, and yet, they seem surprised when it turns out that children have been struggling with serious medical problems, or they’ve been assaulted or abused.

The most common response is ‘well why didn’t the child say something?’ or ‘why didn’t the child talk to an adult?’ Adults constantly assure themselves that children know to go to a grownup when they are in trouble, and they even repeat that sentiment to children; you can always come to us, adults tell children, when you need help. Find a trusted adult, a teacher or a doctor or a police officer or a firefighter, and tell that adult what’s going on, and you’ll be helped, and everything will be all right.

The thing is that children do that, and the adults don’t listen. Every time a child tells an adult about something and nothing happens, that child learns that adults are liars, and that they don’t provide the promised help. Children hold up their end of the deal by reporting, sometimes at great personal risk, and they get no concrete action in return. Sometimes, the very adult people tell a child to ‘trust’ is the least reliable person; the teacher is friends with the priest who is molesting a student, the firefighter plays pool with the father who is beating a child, they don’t want to cause a scene.

Or children are accused of lying for attention because they accused the wrong person. They’re told they must be mistaken about what happened, unclear on the specifics, because there’s no way what they’re saying could be true, so and so isn’t that kind of person. A mother would never do that. He’s a respected member of the community! In their haste to close their ears to the child’s voice, adults make sure the child’s experience is utterly denied and debunked. Couldn’t be, can’t be, won’t be. The child knows not to say such things in the future, because no one is listening, because people will actively tell the child to be quiet.

Children are also told that they aren’t experiencing what they’re actually experiencing, or they’re being fussy about nothing. A child reports a pain in her leg after gym class, and she’s told to quit whining. Four months later, everyone is shocked when her metastatic bone cancer becomes unavoidably apparent. Had someone listened to her in the first place when she reported the original bone pain and said it felt different that usual, she would have been evaluated sooner. A child tells a teacher he has trouble seeing the blackboard, and the teacher dismisses it, so the child is never referred for glasses; the child struggles with math until high school, when someone finally acknowledges there’s a problem.

This attitude, that children shouldn’t be believed, puts the burden of proof on children, rather than assuming that there might be something to their statements. Some people seem to think that actually listening to children would result in a generation of hopelessly spoiled brats who know they can say anything for attention, but would that actually be the case? That assumption is rooted in the idea that children are not trustworthy, and cannot be respected. I’m having trouble understanding why adults should be viewed as inherently trustworthy and respectable, especially in light of the way we treat children.

Children Talk But No One Listens – this ain’t livin’ (via unsungtale)

(via hssanya)


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Jul 6, 2014
@ 1:19 am
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12,056 notes

zenpencils:

BANKSY: Taking the piss

(via hssanya)


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Jul 6, 2014
@ 1:13 am
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78,799 notes

Women: I'm pregnant what should I do?

Pro life: keep the baby!

Women: okay! Can I have prenatal vitamins?

Pro life: what?

Women: can I have financial help for doctor appointments?

Pro life: ummm.....

Women: can I at least get paid maternity leave?

Pro life: ummm... Excuse me?

Women: the baby is here can I get financial help?

Pro life: I'm sorry do we know you?


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Jul 6, 2014
@ 1:13 am
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36,948 notes

thebicker:

thebooksmith:

bitch-media:

On February 25, 2014, Orange is the New Black author Piper Kerman testified at the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee hearings on solitary confinement in Washington, DC. Unlike her fictional character, Kerman was never placed in solitary confinement. But she testified about the many women incarcerated alongside her who had:

While I was in prison, I saw many women sent to the SHU for minor infractions such as moving around a housing unit during a count, refusing an order from a correctional officer, and possession of low-level contraband like small amounts of cash (which is largely useless in prison) or having women’s underwear from the outside rather than prison-issued underwear. All of these infractions drew at least 30 days in solitary. Sometimes women are sent to the SHU immediately upon their arrival in prison because there aren’t any open beds.

Most politicians would rather ignore the reality of the problems with the prison system than address them head-on and risk being seen as “soft on crime.”Orange is the New Black—and Kerman’s determined attempt to link the peoples’ interest in the fictional story to real women’s suffering—has helped get Americans talking about prison in a way few pieces of pop culture have. It’s also a way to get people talking about women in the prison system rather than focusing the conversations around men. It’s also a sad truth that politicians and Americans in general are more likely to listen to a celebrity telling them about prison conditions than someone who didn’t become famous after being incarcerated. To her credit, Kerman (unlike some other celebrities who have experienced short stints behind bars) has been using her platform to advocate for change.

Read the article: Can “Orange is the New Black” Change the Way Congress Thinks About Prisons? 

Team Kerman

It sucks that it takes an upper-middle class white lady experiencing something for people to believe it’s a real thing, but I’m glad OITNB has sparked discussion about the inhumane way we treat prisoners in the U.S.

(via hssanya)


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Jul 6, 2014
@ 1:13 am
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89 notes

In our society, sex-based insult is the coin of the realm. Women live defensively, not just against rape but against the language of the rapist — the language of what a woman is called in intimacy and in public, loud and soft.

Right-Wing Women, by Andrea Dworkin

(via exgynocraticgrrl)

(via hssanya)


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Jul 6, 2014
@ 1:06 am
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To be a feminist means recognizing that one is associated with all women not as an act of choice but as a matter of fact. The sex-class system creates the fact. When that system is broken, there will be no such fact. Feminists do not create this common condition by making alliances: feminists recognize this common condition because it exists as an intrinsic part of sex oppression. The fundamental knowledge that women are a class having a common condition — that the fate of one woman is tied substantively to the fate of all women — toughens feminist theory and practice. That fundamental knowledge is an almost unbearable test of seriousness. There is no real feminism that does not have at its heart the tempering discipline of sex-class consciousness: knowing that women share a common condition as a class, like it or not.

What is that common condition? Subordinate to men, sexually colonized in a sexual system of dominance and submission, denied rights on the basis of sex, historically chattel, generally considered biologically inferior, confined to sex and reproduction: this is the general description of the social environment in which all women live.

Right-Wing Women, by Andrea Dworkin

(via exgynocraticgrrl)

(via hssanya)


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Jul 6, 2014
@ 1:04 am
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ladiesagainsthumanity:

RUTH. BADER. GINSBERG. 

via @sethdmichaels

(Source: ihopeyoulikeblackberries, via wilwheaton)


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Jul 6, 2014
@ 1:04 am
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26,680 notes

Sensory Overload and how to cope.

(click on images to zoom)

(Source: recovery-community, via hssanya)


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Jul 6, 2014
@ 1:02 am
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95 notes

heiroftimelord said: You're autistic and your fighting with me about it?

hssanya:

goldenheartedrose:

equalseleventhirds:

goldenheartedrose:

hssanya:

goldenheartedrose:

Yes.  Because there is nothing wrong with being autistic and it’s the lack of understanding and acceptance that causes 99% of my problems.

Being laughed at and mocked for requesting volume being turned down is not a problem caused by my autism.  It’s caused by allistic people who are assholes.

Having every part of my neurology pathologized, from the way I process information to my obsessions is a result of an ableist society, not my autism.

If people gave a shit about what autistic people had to say, and considered our voices as important (whether our voices are able to verbally speak or communicate via alternate means), we wouldn’t likely be having this conversation.  

You don’t have the right to speak for your relatives and you don’t have the right to speak for me. 

So no, I don’t want a cure and I don’t think one is likely anyways.  If you think the problem is autistic people’s brains and not the way people treat autistic people, you’re not really paying much attention to what’s going on in the world.

That volume one hit me, not because I’m autistic but because I’m half deaf and people can be really horrible when I ask them to turn up music/shows so I can hear it, too. I’ve sat there unable to hear the dialogue of shows so many times because after repeatedly asking for the volume to be turned up my request was ignored so I get all pouty and passive-aggressive about it. “What do you think of the show?” “I have no idea because I can’t hear it and you wouldn’t turn it up but the visuals are nice, although it’s probably ruining it for when I watch it later on my own so I can be be included in discussions we’re inevitably going to have about it”/people taking it personally when I repeatedly ask them what they said and tell them I couldn’t hear them as if I’m using my partial deafness to intentionally be rude or dismissive. 

I can imagine that if myself and goldenheartedrose were to watch a show we’d probably settle on subtitles.

Sorry to hijack this post and make it about my thing, for the record I support goldenheartedrose’s message and views wholeheartedly.

No, no, no, I don’t think that’s a hijack at all.  There are definite similarities between Deaf/HOH folks and people with auditory processing issues (which is common among autistic folks).  I literally can’t watch anything without subtitles if I’m going to absorb anything from what’s going on.  Or I need to know a little bit of what’s going on ahead of time/have had to see a gifset or something on Tumblr or something to get it.

I basically grew up around Deaf culture, and spent 3 years learning ASL in college, but it turned out that my hearing/auditory processing was too terrible to really be able to interpret as a career when relying solely on spoken words vs. written text, etc.  So no worries about a post hijack! This is good information for cross-disability discussions, for sure. 

i have some auditory processing issues (like when i’m on the phone with ppl or watching tv i miss half of their words) and oh my god the number of times ppl have been like ‘but putting subtitles on ruins watching it’ because they’re a distraction or are covering things up or something like

do you want me to watch this with you or not

(and then they get distracted and go ‘what just happened’ WELL I DON’T KNOW DO I)

This is so a thing that has happened to me multiple times.

Absolute ditto, sometimes I just can’t hear what people are saying and I need to ask them to repeat it more than once, then they get offended and act as if I’m intentionally doing it to annoy them. Like I’m faking it or something.

TIL: there is still some hope for humanity.


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Jul 6, 2014
@ 12:59 am
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Anonymous said: In my sex-ed class we were taught about every contraceptive available, and after learning about each one my teacher would also say "But it's not 100% effective so you shouldn't use it"

hssanya:

kiwianaroha:

pro-choice-or-no-voice:

How does that even make sense? If you don’t use it at all it’s 0% effective. That teacher needs to take a sex-ed class. - Paige

1 in 8 people is infertile, meaning 1 in 4 couples are unable to conceive, but, on average, over the course of 12 months approximately 3/4 of people with uteri will fall pregnant with regular intercourse and no contraception. 

However, with correct usage of condoms or a hormonal pill only between 2-5% of people with uteri will fall pregnant. Doubling up on these methods (like a pill + condom combo) will further decrease the risk of pregnancy. Even with imperfect use, only 10-15% of people will fall pregnant, which is a massive reduction from 75-80% using no contraception at all. 

Methods that don’t rely on user compliance (i.e. remembering to take a pill every day and to be careful with condoms or diaphragms) such as an IUD or a hormonal implant can reduce the risk of pregnancy to less than 1%. 

If the teacher can’t see a difference between an almost 80% chance of pregnancy and between 1-15% chance of pregnancy she needs to go back and learn some basic maths.

I was so grossed out at the time but I’m so glad that I had a good sex education. We put condoms on wooden dildos, we discussed underage sex (which perhaps in retrospect was a bit too normalized for my liking) I knew all about my body and what was going to happen I could point out all my glands to you and tell you all about my hormone production and I knew exactly what to expect during my first period to the point that I was like “Oh. Well. Here we go. Only 40-50 more years of this bullshit to put up with” I didn’t laugh at pre-pubescent boys getting erections in class because I was taught to expect that. We addressed the normalcy of being gay and normalized masturbation. We were assured that body hair is normal on women and that we won’t all develop to look like the correct model, we all understood that we would be different and our bodies would be different and our vaginas and our hips and our breasts and nobody was lesser and nobody was wrong. Also I was taught I had a pee-hole under my clit, I was taught about my clit! I knew where I peed from! Why wouldn’t you educate American children about this stuff? Why?

I (originally) went to an all boys high school with a sex education that included watching episodes of the human body during our ‘health’ class. No discussions on how to properly use a condom or anything relating to sexually transmitted infections/disease… or really anything. We just watched a tv series.